The hand

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Artwork by my colleague, Tiziana.

I want to share this useful drawing I found on the white board in one of the class rooms. I don’t know who the artist is but he/she deserves a thank you. I have now discovered whose artwork this is….thank you Tiziana!

Use the language

Meanwhile, do you know that many body parts can be used as verbs? For example, everyone knows what “a hand” is but what does “TO HAND” mean? Can you give me a few examples with the verb “to hand?


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Visa application: Name of SPOUSE

Today I’m giving you another useful word, SPOUSE. This can be used instead of “husband” or “wife” and is commonly found in official situations. When you apply for a passport or visa or even when opening a bank account, there is usually a question about whether you are married or not. If you answer yes, then you’ll need to reply to the next question: name of spouse.

When an invitation to a wedding, cocktail party or some other event is addressed such:

  • Ms Smith and spouse, the both Mrs Smith and her husband can attend the function.
  • Mr Darwin and spouse, then both Mr Darwin and his wife can attend the function.

The same applies if it’s a same-sex marriage.

Use the language

Do you have a word for spouse in your language? What is it and when is it used?


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Adam Smith by D. D. Raphael

Three words that I found interesting from a slim volume about the philosopher and economist, Adam Smith.

Adam Smith

Here they are:

  • INDUCEMENT – Those of you working in sales know that the more you sell, the more money you take home at the end of the month. The commission earned is an inducement to work harder and sell more. In sports, the possibility of winning an Olympic gold medal is an inducement for athletes to train for long  hours every day, in any weather, over many years.
  • ARDUOUS – To get that important sales contract or win the Olympic gold, you have to make many sacrifices. Missing out on parties, little time for family or friends, physical or mental stress –  it’s arduous work. Certainly not an easy life trying to achieve your aims, is it?
  • FRUGAL – When the times are good we take our 2 holidays a year, buy the latest flat screen, 3D TV and throw  away food just one day after the Best Before date. Money no problem! However, if the economy is not doing so well or there’s the risk of losing our job, our lifestyle becomes frugal. Let’s take the holiday in our home city instead, that TV can wait another few months and the Best Before date on the foodstuffs is only a suggestion.

Use the language

Which of these 3 words is most useful for you? Come on, write in to explain why!


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Good to be ALWAYS ALRIGHT!

ALRIGHT, I’m ALWAYS repeating myself about this but please don’t forget that:

alright – one “L”. When writing formally, it is better to use the full form, “all right”

always – same rule, one “L”. But no, it’s not short for “all ways”

Other common “AL” words with one “L” are:

although
altogether
almost

Use the language

All these words – always, alright, although, altogether, almost – in one sentence. Can you do it?


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A pitcher

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It’s time to party so fill that empty pitcher with wine, beer or… water?! While you’re still sober, notice how two parts of the body can be used to describe parts of the pitcher. The HANDLE is where you put your hand to hold or lift it while the LIP is where the liquid comes out from.

Cheers and all the best to you!


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An American vampire has a GOOD HEAD ON HIS SHOULDERS?

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If from this situation you think that HAVING A GOOD HEAD ON YOUR SHOULDERS is a positive characteristic, you are correct. In fact, it has a variety of meanings: sensible, intelligent, wise, responsible. Therefore it’s a compliment if someone tells you that you have a good head on your shoulders.

Use the language

Is there anyone you know who can be described as having a good head on his/her shoulders? Why?


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An American vampire just doesn’t HAVE THE STOMACH FOR it

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The other time the conversation in class was about bungee jumping. Quite a few students said that they would never try it because they weren’t brave enough to jump off a bridge or platform with only an elastic cord around the waist. I had to admit that I, too, don’t HAVE THE STOMACH FOR it. Zip-lining yes, bungee jumping no. I have a similar fear of cockroaches – small and harmless insects – so I just don’t have the stomach for killing them.

Use the language

Confession time! What don’t you have the stomach for?


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